Correlating Cardium Stratigraphy Using Static Bottom Hole Pressures

$2.00

R. D. Pendergast,
Lynes United Services Ltd

1969

Abstract

The use of static bottom hole pressures is often overlooked as another method to evaluate regional geological horizons or a particular exploration play. Static bottom hole pressure of a formation can be defined as the max imum or stabilized pressure reached at a particular depth in a given time, and is obtained mainly from drill stem test data and bottom hole pressure surveys. The relationship between the pressure of points along a trend gives an indication of the hydrodynamic or hydrostatic conditions that exist within the trend. For example, if the pressures at various points increase accord- ing to the depth of the formation, and if the slope of the pressure versus depth line is proportional to the density of the reservoir water, then the trend is under hydrostatic conditions. If the slope of the pressure versus depth curve is not proportional to the density of the reservoir water, then the trend is under hydrodynamic conditions or entirely separate pressure systems are indicated within the trend. The above application of pressure is displayed through the use of a pressure elevation graph and suggests certain correlations can be made in the Cardium by this method.